Constitutional Amendment in Iowa new Republican strategy to get tough on abortion

4 The Record

Here are some of the topics our panel discussed on 4 The Record this week.

+ President Trump’s second summit with the North Korean dictator ends without a deal.

+ Legalized sports betting measures move forward.

+ A different approach to get tough on abortion emerges in Iowa.

All of that came up for discussion with with former Rock Island County Democratic Party Chair Doug House and former Iowa State Representative David Millage, a Republican, on 4 The Record.

New abortion-related measures in Iowa

There are four. Republicans introduced a bill that would declare that life begins at conception.

This is the fundamental argument in this debate.

Another proposal is a constitutional amendment that would state there’s no right to abortion in Iowa’s constitution.

The strategy is to weaken the state’s court system’s ability to review limits on abortion.

A third would increase the punishment to life in prison for anyone convicted of intentionally ending a pregnancy.

A fourth would prevent the state from using federal money for sex education programs run by organizations that perform abortions.

We saw Republicans give up the legal fight over the fetal heartbeat law.
    
House and Millage discussed how effective this strategy can be and the likelihood these won’t clear the courts either.

Sports betting

Legalized sports betting has a lot of state governments busy this session.

Iowa has 10 study bills on the issue.

Two similar proposals seem to have the best chance.

They would legalize traditional sports betting and daily fantasy sports.

It would authorize the activity for the state’s casinos, horse racing tracks and other facilities.

Illinois Governor JB Pritzker is backing a proposal in his state he says would generate $217 million in licenses and tax revenues.

Illinois would issue 20 licenses at a cost of $10 million each.

In-person and mobile wagering would be allowed.

There are a lot of competing interests.

The eventual details could get complicated and perhaps doom the proposals.

Let’s say they pass. Millage and House addressed what kind of impact there would be among states that adopt significantly different laws on this issue.
    
Cohen testimony

President Trump’s former lawyer testified before the House oversight committee this week.

Michael Cohen did not have good things to say about his former boss.
    
Cohen himself has already been convicted of lying to Congress.

He essentially accused the president of committing five felonies.

One comment he made late might have been missed by a lot of people.

Cohen said that if the president loses the 2020 election, he doesn’t think there would be a peaceful transition of power.

House and Millage talked about how concerned Americans should be after Cohen’s testimony.

Summit

Donald Trump and Kim Jong Un the second time around ended without a deal to denuclearize North Korea.

Democratic leadership like Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer supported the president for walking away and not lifting sanctions.

There are some who say it was a no lose situation for Kim Jong Un — simply being on the same stage as the American president is a win.

Millage and House discussed what the United States can do to apply more pressure on North Korea — or if the country out of options.

Watch the full conversation in the video above.

Question of the week

That brings us to our question of the week.

What do you think about legalizing sports betting in Iowa and Illinois?

Local 4 News, your local election headquarters, is proud to present 4 The Record, a weekly news and public affairs program focused on the issues important to you.  It’s a program unlike any other here in the Quad Cities. Tune in each Sunday at 10:30 a.m. as Jim Niedelman brings you up to speed on what’s happening in the political arena, from Springfield, Des Moines, Washington, D.C. and right here at home.

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