A Davenport woman finds a flyer on her lawn. Now, she sleeps with a baseball bat next to her bed.

Local News

Couple, newspaper owner believe they were targeted by hate group

A woman in davenport is upset after she picked up her newspaper with a racist message stuck to it.

She found it on her front lawn yesterday.

It reads, “Send them back. They can’t make white babies.”

She believes she was targeted because she’s in an interracial marriage.

The group behind the message is the National Alliance.

The Southern Poverty Law Center considers it a neo-nazi extremist group.

The couple who found the flyer didn’t want to go on camera tonight because they’re worried about their safety.

This message is a sticker that was put onto the newspaper, called The Real Mainstream, based in Iowa City.

The editor was shocked to hear about the incident.

“I was surprised to see it happening here, I’m suprised to see it happening in the Quad Cities because we, again, believe that Iowans don’t believe in that kind of message. Overall, Iowans are a compassionate, caring and open-minded group of people,” Christine Hawes says.

But she says this isn’t the first time she’s seen something like this happen.

Hawes started her publication less than a year ago.

She describes it as a free, alternative newspaper that identifies strongly with the LGBTQ community.

Her goal is to unite people of all backgrounds.

“It’s this kind of hate speech that needs to be marginalized and it’s people of differing faiths and differing backgrounds that don’t deserve to be marginalized. That’s really what we’re there for, to create a greater sense of compassion and collaboration,” she says.

In June, Haws says the same group, the National Alliance, targeted another progressive paper in Iowa City.

Hawes says by choosing their newspapers to spread a hateful message, this group is attacking more than race.

“Essentially taking such a positive message and wrapping it in such a horrible message, it’s a way to try to confuse, erase, pit people against each other, diminish the strength of our message,” Hawes says.

Hawes says the incident inspires her.

“To hear the agony of the person that called to let us know about this flyer, to hear the pain that these flyers caused… It inspires us to work harder and we hope that it inspires everybody… to work a little harder and to keep putting the good word out there,” she says.

Copyright 2019 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.